The Labrador's history


The Labrador is a direct descendant of the St. John dog, a crossbreed between an autochthonous breed and the hunting dogs imported from England, reared by English fishermen on the Isle of Newfoundland, beginning from the XVII century. His roots intertwine with those of the Newfoundland dog
La razza fu quindi allevata e selezionata da alcuni nobili inglesi, tra cui il Conte di Malmesbury, al quale si deve la nascita nel 1885, di Buccleuch Avon, il primo esemplare di Labrador come oggi lo conosciamo.
At the beginning of the 1800, it was imported in England on ships coming from the Labrador peninsula. The breed was then reared and selected by some English nobles, among them the Earl of Malmesbury, thanks to whom, in 1885, Buccleuch Avon was born, the first specimen of Labrador as known in our days.
Four years later the birth of Buccleuch Avon, who had a black coat, the first yellow Labrador was born, Ben of Hyde. The diffusion of light coat dogs, though, became significant only after 1920.
The "chocolate" Labrador breeding started instead in the '30 of the XX century.
Thanks to his great qualities as a hunting dog and gundog, the Labrador had a great diffusion in England, so that it was even reared by King George VI.
The Kennel Club officially acknowledged the breed in 1903.
The first breed's standard was drafted in 1916 and was partly modified in 1950. The FCI standard in force at present, was drafted in 1989. The American Kennel Club standard was drafted in 1994 and slightly diverges from the FCI one. Today Labradors are the most common dogs in the world, especially in England, Western Europe and in the United States.




 
Puppy of labrador